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Wow Bao Contest, Ronero’s Happy Hour

Wow Bao Eating Championship

Wow Bao

Wow Bao

Oysters take the spotlight at Chicago’s newest happy hour. Nowadays, head to RoneroTuesday through Thursday from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. to enjoy discounted food and drinks, including dollar oysters. The freshly shucked bivalves come with a variety of accompaniments, including leche de tigre mignonette, house-fermented hot sauce and Brazilian farofa. Champagne and rosé specials are also on hand for happy hour, with selections changing weekly.

Carryout and Delivery at Big Jones

As the temperature continues to dip, one thing becomes increasingly clear: it’s delivery season. But just because you want to hibernate at home doesn’t mean you need to sacrifice quality in food. Thankfully, restaurants like Big Jones are raising the bar on delivery (and carryout) with menu options that provide restaurant-caliber cuisine right at your front door. Andersonville’s premiere Southern-inspired restaurant features an impressive menu lineup this season, including fried chicken, barbecued pork shoulder po’ boys, gumbo, pimento cheese and shrimp & grits, along with sweets like housemade dark chocolate-rum chocolate macaroon chunk ice cream. The carryout and delivery menu is available during lunch and dinner on weekdays, and during dinner on weekends. Check out the full menu here: https://bigjoneschicago.com/dine/to-go/

baozi (ChineseAbout this sound 包子) or simply known as baobauhumbownunubakpao (Hokkien), bausakpowpau, or pao (Hakka) is a type of steamed, filled bun[1] or bread-like (i.e. made with yeast) item in various Chinese cuisines, as there is much variation as to the fillings and the preparations. In its bun-like aspect it is very similar to the traditional Chinese mantou. It can be filled with meat and/or vegetarian fillings.

Two types are found in most parts of China and Indonesia: Dàbāo (大包, “big bun”), measuring about 10 cm across, served individually, and usually purchased for take-away. The other type, Xiǎobāo (小包, “small bun”), measure approximately 5 cm wide, and are most commonly eaten in restaurants, but may also be purchased for take-away. Each order consists of a steamer containing between three and ten pieces. A small ceramic dish is provided for vinegar or soy sauce, both of which are available in bottles at the table, along with various types of chili and garlic pastes, oils or infusions, fresh coriander and leeks, sesame oil, and other flavorings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baozi