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Spring Flower Workshop, St. Joseph’s Day Zeppole

Spring Flower Workshop

Spring Flower Workshop

Spring Flower Workshop

 

After the onslaught of green beer and general debauchery that comes with St. Patrick’s Day, it’s refreshing to see a wholesome holiday come along. Especially one hinged on Italian doughnuts. St. Joseph’s Day takes place March 19, and to celebrate the holiday, Osteria Via Stato is slinging traditional zeppole. One of the few spots to get them in Chicago, Osteria Via Stato makes their fritters with a cream filling and house-marinated cherries, available on March 19 in packages of six or 12. Orders can be placed by calling the restaurant by March 17 for pick-up all day Friday and Saturday. Zeppole will also be available as a dessert option at the restaurant on March 19.

 

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Spring Flower Workshop at Hotel Burnham

With spring on the very near horizon, it’s time to start thinking about flowers. Not only picking flowers and making bouquets, but also drinking them. Hotel Burnham puts the spotlight on florals with their Spring Flower Workshop, in partnership with Flowers for Dreams. The event takes place in the hotel’s Reliance Room at 11:00 a.m. March 20, wherein attendees will learn how to create spring bouquets to take home, all while creating and sipping flower-infused cocktails. Atwood‘s head bartender Ray Anguiano will also be stocking a gratis build-your-own mimosa bar with various edible flowers. The price to attend is $30 per person, with a portion of proceeds going to the UCP Seguin and Garfield Park Conservatory Alliance. For those of you who can’t make March 20, Hotel Burnham is hosting another Spring Flower Workshop on April 3.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
St. Joseph's Day Zeppole

St. Joseph’s Day Zeppole

 

A Zeppola (plural: zeppole; in southern Italian dialects: zeppole, in north eastern dialects: frittelle) is an Italian pastry consisting of a deep-fried dough ball of varying size but typically about 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter. This doughnut or fritter is usually topped with powdered sugar, and may be filled with custard, jelly, cannoli-style pastry cream, or a butter-and-honey mixture. The consistency ranges from light and puffy, to bread- orpasta-like.

Zeppole are typical of Italian cuisine, especially that of Rome and Naples. They are also served in Sicily, Sardinia, on the island of Malta, and in Italian-Canadian and Italian-American communities in Canada and theUnited States. Zeppole are known by other names, including Bignè di San Giuseppe (in Rome), St. Joseph’s Day cake, and sfinge.[1] Zeppole are traditionally consumed during the Festa di San Giuseppe (Saint Joseph’s Day) celebrated every March 19, when zeppole are sold on many streets and sometimes presented as gifts. In Istria, Croatia this pastry is called blenzi in the Croatian speaking places and zeppole in the Italian-speaking places.They are always topped with sugar either powered or coarse. The custom was popularized in the early 19th century by Neapolitan baker Pasquale Pintauro.[1]