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Taste the Rainbow: Gay Pride

Taste the Rainbow: Gay Pride

Taste the Rainbow: Gay Pride

Taste the Rainbow: Gay Pride

 

As the glittery Gay Pride Parade gets underway this weekend, it’s a fine time to feast on all things rainbow-hued in Chicago. And in honor of Gay Pride Month, restaurants and bars have rolled out a miscellany of colorful eats and treats.

 

 

Things get sweet at Magnolia Bakery, where Pride-friendly cupcakes are made with chocolate or vanilla cake, rainbow decorations, and confetti sprinkles………CONTINUE:  

The LGBT Pride March is an annual march more commonly referred to as the Pride Parade in New York City, traversing southward down Fifth Avenue and ending at Greenwich Village. The March passes by the site of theStonewall Inn on Christopher Street, location of the 1969 police raid which launched the modern Gay Rights Movement.[1]

The March, The Rally, PrideFest (the festival) and the Dance on the Pier are the main events of Pride Week in New York City LGBT Pride Week. Since 1984, Heritage of Pride (HOP) has been the producer and organizer of Pride Events in New York City.[2]

History:Early on the morning of Saturday, 28 June 1969, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar at 53 Christopher Street, New York City. This riot and further protests and rioting over the following nights were the watershed moment in modern LGBT rights movement and the impetus for organizing LGBT pride marches on a much larger public scale.On November 2, 1969, Craig Rodwell, his partner Fred Sargeant, Ellen Broidy, and Linda Rhodes proposed the first pride march to be held in New York City by way of a resolution at the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (ERCHO) meeting inPhiladelphia.[3]

“That the Annual Reminder, in order to be more relevant, reach a greater number of people, and encompass the ideas and ideals of the larger struggle in which we are engaged-that of our fundamental human rights-be moved both in time and location.
We propose that a demonstration be held annually on the last Saturday in June in New York City to commemorate the 1969 spontaneous demonstrations on Christopher Street and this demonstration be called CHRISTOPHER STREET LIBERATION DAY. No dress or age regulations shall be made for this demonstration.